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catspaw

This wildflower looks just like a “cat’s paw,” don’t you think? I took this photograph out on Black Canyon Trail on Lumpy Ridge last summer.

Have you ever seen a Cat’s Paw wildflower?

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endovalleyoldbridge

When the flood hit last year it brought down “football fields” full of rocks and boulders at the Alluvial Fan in Rocky Mountain National Park. It wiped out the walking bridge and re-routed the river.

The NPS has just finished repairing the road and built a new bridge over the river so that cars can now drive into the west parking lot.

One-way Old Fall River Road should open on time, July 4th weekend, next summer.

This photograph is of the old walking bridge on the trail to the Alluvial Fan. It looks like a little waterfall. There is now a short gravely trail from the road part way up through the boulders, but no bridge to get across. This couple hopped across the rocks to get across. But be careful, the river is running pretty fast. You can also get to the other side from the east parking lot.

 

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gaillardiaoct

I was so surprised to see this pretty yellow Gaillardia, also known as a Blanketflower, still blooming on Black Canyon Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park. It looks a little droopy, but just the splash of color was such a treat to see! We have had such a gorgeous, warm fall!

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elkhiddenvalley

This “Big Guy” was about 5 feet from the trail at Hidden Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park. He looked at me and I looked at him, clicked a few photographs and left him alone to rest. He must be exhausted from the rut!

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americandipper1

I have never seen an American Dipper at Hidden Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park. And there was one on the log over the stream. What a surprise!

American Dippers live along fast-flowing mountain waters. You can always tell it is an American Dipper by the way it bobs up and down. In search for food, the dipper dives into the water looking for aquatic larval, insects, fish fry or eggs.

I remember we once saw one dive through the very fast-moving Ouzel Falls in Rocky Mountain National Park. It had made its nest on the ledge behind the waterfall. So cool!

Have you ever seen an American Dipper?

 

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trailridgeoct

Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park is still open and gorgeous! A couple of weeks ago we thought that Trail Ridge Road was going to close early due to snow. And then the weather turned warm again and it looks like it’s going to be open later than normal.

I took this photograph a couple of days ago. Look at all the snow and those beautiful mountains.

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